The New Deal on Data

Nov 16 2014

The New Deal on Data

https://idcubed.org/home_page_feature/report-from-davos-2013-the-new-deal-on-data/

From Alex `Sandy’ Pentland of MIT Media Lab….

Since last spring’s announcement of EU and US regulatory initiatives around personal data, there has been a great deal of background activity between regulators and industry. As might be expected, there has been some change in positions. The EU, with its legal framework based on human rights, has changed from its initial position the least. The US, with its tradition of regulation only when you need it, seems to have moved to a more gradualist position. The exception is the case of personal data relating to children, where the US seems in very good accord with the EU.

Industry seems to be coalescing around an intermediate position. The dominant industry suggestion seems to be that regulators should focus more on data use than collection, with the idea that all personal data be required to include metadata about provenance and use permissions. Such metadata would allow automatic auditing, and would allow applications to go back to users for additional permissions when required.

However such a metadata structure would not, by itself, support auditing and the right to change permissions (including the right to be forgotten or to not to be tracked). There also needs to be a dictionary of who has collected data about you and the ability to use the dictionary entries to check and change permissions by following the chain of provenance. However industry does not want to make it too easy for consumers to opt out, and a central dictionary is a security risk, so the final form of the dictionary architecture is unclear (but several of the big guys are experimenting with our openPDS architecture). Whatever the final dictionary architecture, everyone believes that there will be the need for new services that keep track of your personal data, and helps you manage permissions.

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Reality Mining

Sep 04 2014

Reality Mining

Using Big Data to Engineer a Better World

By Nathan Eagle and Kate Greene

Overview

Big Data is made up of lots of little data: numbers entered into cell phones, addresses entered into GPS devices, visits to websites, online purchases, ATM transactions, and any other activity that leaves a digital trail. Although the abuse of Big Data—surveillance, spying, hacking—has made headlines, it shouldn’t overshadow the abundant positive applications of Big Data. In Reality Mining, Nathan Eagle and Kate Greene cut through the hype and the headlines to explore the positive potential of Big Data, showing the ways in which the analysis of Big Data (“Reality Mining”) can be used to improve human systems as varied as political polling and disease tracking, while considering user privacy.

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Big Data Book

Mar 10 2013

Welcome to “big data” — the idea that we can do with a vast amount of data things that we simply couldn’t when we had less. The change in scale leads to a change in state. It upends the nature of business, how government works and the way we live, from healthcare to education. Big data will even change how we think about the world and our place in it.

According to data available at the health guidance.org the data is becoming the oil of the information age; a raw material and the foundation of new goods and services. We can tap it because society is rendering into a data format things that never were before, from our friendships (think Facebook) to our whispers (think Twitter) to the way our car engines grunt before a breakdown. It took a decade and billions of dollars to decode the first human genome ten years ago. Today, that same amount of DNA is sequenced in a day. The implications are as huge as the datasets themselves.

As we collect and crunch more data, the good news is that we can do extraordinary things: fight disease, reduce climate change, unlock mysteries of science. The bad news is that it raises a host of worries for which society is unprepared. What does it mean if big data denies us a bank loan or considers us unfit for a surgical operation, but we can’t learn the explicit reasons because the variables that went in were so myriad and complex? How do you regulate an algorithm?

Join Viktor Mayer-Schönberger of the Oxford Internet Institute and Kenneth Cukier of The Economist on a fascinating journey to the world of big data. The book will surprise you, amuse you, anger you and inspire you. In the end, it may even just change the way you look at everything.

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Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age

Feb 28 2013

Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age

http://press.princeton.edu/titles/8981.html

Delete looks at the surprising phenomenon of perfect remembering in the digital age, and reveals why we must reintroduce our capacity to forget. Digital technology empowers us as never before, yet it has unforeseen consequences as well. Potentially humiliating content on Facebook is enshrined in cyberspace for future employers to see. Google remembers everything we’ve searched for and when. The digital realm remembers what is sometimes better forgotten, and this has profound implications for us all.

In Delete, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger traces the important role that forgetting has played throughout human history, from the ability to make sound decisions unencumbered by the past to the possibility of second chances. The written word made it possible for humans to remember across generations and time, yet now digital technology and global networks are overriding our natural ability to forget–the past is ever present, ready to be called up at the click of a mouse. Mayer-Schönberger examines the technology that’s facilitating the end of forgetting–digitization, cheap storage and easy retrieval, global access, and increasingly powerful software–and describes the dangers of everlasting digital memory, whether it’s outdated information taken out of context or compromising photos the Web won’t let us forget. He explains why information privacy rights and other fixes can’t help us, and proposes an ingeniously simple solution–expiration dates on information–that may.

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Foursquare

Jan 26 2013

https://foursquare.com/about/

Foursquare is a location-based social networking website for mobile devices, such as smartphones. Users “check in” at venues using a mobile website, text messaging or a device-specific application by selecting from a list of venues the application locates nearby. Location is based on GPS hardware in the mobile device or network location provided by the application. Each check-in awards the user points and sometimes “badges”.

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MasterCard mines data for marketers

Jan 26 2013

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/089f7cd0-16f2-11e2-b1df-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2J4oQA3K0

MasterCard is analysing transaction data to help marketers direct targeted advertising at consumers, after launching a controversial initiative to make money from its vast database of retail purchases.

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Big Data: The Management Revolution

Jan 11 2013

http://hbr.org/2012/10/big-data-the-management-revolution/ar/1

HBR, October 2012

“You can’t manage what you don’t measure.”

There’s much wisdom in that saying, which has been attributed to both W. Edwards Deming and Peter Drucker, and it explains why the recent explosion of digital data is so important. Simply put, because of big data, managers can measure, and hence know, radically more about their businesses, and directly translate that knowledge into improved decision making and performance.

Consider retailing. Booksellers in physical stores could always track which books sold and which did not. If they had a loyalty program, they could tie some of those purchases to individual customers. And that was about it. Once shopping moved online, though, the understanding of customers increased dramatically. Online retailers could track not only what customers bought, but also what else they looked at; how they navigated through the site; how much they were influenced by promotions, reviews, and page layouts; and similarities across individuals and groups. Before long, they developed algorithms to predict what books individual customers would like to read next—algorithms that performed better every time the customer responded to or ignored a recommendation. Traditional retailers simply couldn’t access this kind of information, let alone act on it in a timely manner. It’s no wonder that Amazon has put so many brick-and-mortar bookstores out of business.

Read this too:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/30/technology/big-data-is-great-but-dont-forget-intuition.html?goback=.gde_23006_member_201718523

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2013 Workshop on Behavior and Social Informatics

Dec 20 2012

http://datamining.it.uts.edu.au/bsi/bsi2013/

The 2013 International Workshop on Behavior and Social Informatics (BSI2013) will be held in conjunction with The 2013 Pacific-Asia Conference on Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery (PAKDD2013).

Important Dates

Paper Submission Deadline: January 06, 2013 (Submission System)
Author Notification: January 31, 2013
Camera-Ready Deadline: February 15, 2013

General Information

Behavior and social science are increasingly recognized as a key component in business intelligence and problem-solving. Behavior and Social Informatics (BSI) has been emerged as a new scientific field that studies effective methodologies, techniques and technical tools for representing, modeling, analyzing, understanding and managing human behaviors and social characteristics. Unlike traditional behavior and social science, which mainly focuses on qualitative and explicit behavior and social appearance and drivers, BSI intends to support explicit behavioral and societal involvement through a conversion from transactional entity spaces to behavior/social feature spaces, through a better understanding of interactions between users and computing systems and better modeling of social concepts like trust, credibility, privacy, and, and influence, further genuine analysis of native behavior/social patterns and impacts, and the facilitation of deployment of information technologies in various socially-centric application domains. A typical BSI process consists of key components including behavior/social modeling and representation, behavior/social data construction, behavior/social impact modeling, behavior/social pattern analysis and utilization, and behavior/social interplay with information technologies. Some popular examples of BSI include web usage and user preference analysis, collective intelligence and crowd behavior, credit evaluation, exceptional behavior analysis of terrorist and criminals, and trading pattern analysis of investors in capital markets.

Recent years have witnessed increasing research attention on behavior/social-oriented analyses including behavioral and social interaction and network, behavioral/social patterns, behavioral/social impacts, the formation of behavioral/social-oriented groups and collective intelligence, and behavioral/social intelligence emergence. This trend raises the need for launching the International Workshop on Behavior and Social Informatics (BSI). BSI’2013 aims to increase potential collaborations and partnerships by bringing together academic researchers and industry practitioners from data mining, statistics and analytics, business and marketing, finance and politics, and behavioral, social and psychological sciences with the objectives to present updated research efforts and progresses on foundational and emerging interdisciplinary topics of BSI, exchange new ideas and identify future research directions.

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IEEE Task Force on Behavior and Social Informatics

Dec 20 2012

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Stop Collecting Customer

Dec 04 2012

Stop Collecting Customer

Let consumers control their personal profiles

By Doc Searls

Vendors have been amassing and mining customer’s personal data for years, armed with increasingly sophisticated and aggressive technologies and dazzled by fantasies of “personalizing” marketing to the maximum extent possible. Customers naturally see this trend as a gross invasion of their privacy and are starting to resist providing accurate information – or any information at all.

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Auto analytics as a new human dimension of big data analytics

Oct 19 2012

1. HBR Blog Network
The Social Side of Auto-Analytics

http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/09/the_social_side_of_auto-analytics.html

2. Quantified Self
Self knowledge through numbers

http://quantifiedself.com/

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The Personal Analytics of My Life

Sep 15 2012

http://blog.stephenwolfram.com/2012/03/the-personal-analytics-of-my-life/

One day I’m sure everyone will routinely collect all sorts of data about themselves. But because I’ve been interested in data for a very long time, I started doing this long ago. I actually assumed lots of other people were doing it too, but apparently they were not. And so now I have what is probably one of the world’s largest collections of personal data.

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Big Google Data & Analytics

Mar 02 2012

http://iianalytics.com/2012/02/big-google-data-analytics-big-money-and-big-privacy-debate/

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Internet, Politics, Policy 2012: Big Data, Big Challenges?

Mar 02 2012

http://microsites.oii.ox.ac.uk/ipp2012/

Recent years have seen an increasing buzz around how ‘Big Data’ can uncover patterns of human behaviour and help predict social trends. Most social activities today leave digital imprints that can be collected and stored in the form of large datasets of transactional data. These data are already being used to prevent epidemics or combat fraud and crime, but the research potential of these data is still underexploited.

The impact of Big Data goes beyond academic research: the behavioural insights gained from transactional information can also be used to drive evidence-based policy making and ‘nudge’ political behaviour. However, the technical skills necessary to analyse large datasets often prevent social scientists from exploiting its potential. Much detail is also lost in the analysis of Big Data, which emphasises aggregated patterns over mechanisms operating at the individual level and lacks the demographic information of survey data, for example.

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Google to merge user data across its services

Feb 06 2012

(CNN) — Google plans to start combining information the company collects about each user of its various websites and services into a single profile, the company announced on Tuesday.

Previously, Google said it did not create comprehensive profiles across its various properties, including its leading search engine, Android smartphone operating system and YouTube video site.

In a statement, Alma Whitten, a Google privacy director, wrote that the changes “will mean a simpler, more intuitive Google experience.” She added, “Our recently launched personal search feature is a good example of the cool things Google can do when we combine information across products.”

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2012/01/24/tech/web/google-privacy-policy/index.html?iid=EAL

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Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age

Feb 06 2012

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To Big To Know

Dec 31 2011

To Big To Know is a book that David Weinberger to be published in January 2012 by Basic Books.

Too Big to Know is about what happens to knowledge and expertise now that we are faced with the fact that there is way way way more to know than can be known by any individual. Its hypothesis is that knowledge and expertise are becoming networks, and are taking on the properties of networks.

“Too Big to Know is a stunning and profound book on how our concept of knowledge is changing in the age of the net. It honors the traditional social practices of knowing, where genres stay fixed, and provides a graceful way of understanding new strategies for knowing in today’s rapidly evolving, networked world. I couldn’t put this book down. It is a true tour du force written in a delightful way.”

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The Machine That Would Predict the Future

Dec 31 2011

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The Really Smart Phone

Oct 12 2011

The Really Smart Phone

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704547604576263261679848814.html

Researchers are harvesting a wealth of intimate detail from our cellphone data, uncovering the hidden patterns of our social lives, travels, risk of disease—even our political views.

VIDEO

Apple and Google may be intensifying privacy concerns by tracking where and when people use their mobile phones—but the true future of consumer surveillance is taking shape inside the cellphones at a weather-stained apartment complex in Cambridge, Mass.

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The Funf Open Sensing Framework

Oct 12 2011

The Funf Open Sensing Framework

http://funf.media.mit.edu/

The Funf Open Sensing Framework is an extensible sensing and data processing framework for mobile devices, developed at the MIT Media Lab. The core concept is to provide an open source, reusable set of functionalities, enabling the collection, uploading, and configuration of a wide range of data types.

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